Vector abundance and species composition of Anopheles mosquitoin Central Region and Central West Highlands, Viet Nam

  • Kim Khue Ngo Faculty of Biology-Agricultural Engineering, University of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam
  • Xuan Quang Nguyen Institude of Malariology, Parasitology and Entomology of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam
  • Van Chuong Nguyen Institude of Malariology, Parasitology and Entomology of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam
  • Thi Mong Diep Nguyen Faculty of Biology-Agricultural Engineering, University of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam
Keywords: Anopheles, Ethiopia, infectivity rate, malaria, mosquitoes, diseases vectors

Abstract

Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Viet Nam. In 2008, World Health Organization reported an estimated value of 243 million cases with a mortality of about 863 thousand in the world. Malaria transmission in the Central Region and Central West Highlands of Viet Nam is known to be holoendemic and perennial. High humidity (80%) and a high mean temperature of 25°C in this area favour the bionomics of the principal malaria vectors. Vector control is a major component of the Global Malaria Control Strategy and still remains the most generally effective measure to prevent malaria transmission. Successful application of vector control measures requires the understanding of the bionomics of Anopheles species responsible for malaria transmission, including correct and precise identification of the target species and its distribution.This study was conducted to provide information on the vector abundance and species composition of Anopheles mosquito at Quang Binh, Binh Đinh, Khanh Hoa, Ninh Thuan, Gia Lai, Dak Lak ofCentral Region and Central West Highlands of Viet Nam. A total of 18 Anopheles species were collected in these provinces, therein, the 2main vectors are An. minimus and An. dirus, and the 3 secondary vectors are An. aconitus, An. jeyporiensis, An. maculatus. An. dirus and An. minimus species are present in most of the studied communes in 6 provinces, An. aconitus, An. jeyporiensis and An. maculatusare present in Binh Dinh, Ninh Thuan and Gia Lai provinces, whileAn. jeyporiensisdoes not seem to be found in the other provinces.

Author Biographies

Kim Khue Ngo, Faculty of Biology-Agricultural Engineering, University of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam

Faculty of Biology-Agricultural Engineering, University of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam

Xuan Quang Nguyen, Institude of Malariology, Parasitology and Entomology of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam

Institude of Malariology, Parasitology and Entomology of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam

Van Chuong Nguyen, Institude of Malariology, Parasitology and Entomology of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam

Institude of Malariology, Parasitology and Entomology of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam

Thi Mong Diep Nguyen, Faculty of Biology-Agricultural Engineering, University of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam

Faculty of Biology-Agricultural Engineering, University of Quy Nhon, Quy Nhon City, Viet Nam

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Published
2018-11-30