Clinical profile of sleep apnea syndrome in a tertiary care center

Authors

  • Raju Kottakota Assistant Professor, Department of Respiratory Medicine, GIMSR, GITAM, Deemed to be University, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Nikhila Dasari Assistant Professor, Department of Respiratory Medicine, GIMSR, GITAM, Deemed to be University, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • V.V.N.Goutham Associate Professor, Department of General Medicine, GIMSR, GITAM, Deemed To Be University, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Mahanti Sreenu Assistant Professor, Department of General Medicine, GIMSR, GITAM, Deemed To Be University, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India

Keywords:

apneas, hypopneas, SDB, PSG, BMI.

Abstract

Introduction: Sleep related breathing disorders refer to an abnormal respiratory pattern (e.g.: apneas, hypopneas, or respiratory effort related arousals) or an abnormal reduction in gas exchange (e.g., hypoventilation) during sleep. They tend to repetitively alter sleep duration and architecture, resulting in daytime symptoms, signs, or organ system dysfunction. Materials and Methods: All patients attended Chest OPD with complaints of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) like Snoring, excessive day time sleepiness, witnessed breathing pause, nocturnal choking, as well as patients referred from other departments for evaluation of SDB were taken up for further screening. All patients attended Chest OPD with complaints of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) like Snoring, excessive day time sleepiness, witnessed breathing pause, nocturnal choking, as well as patients referred from other departments for evaluation of SDB were taken up for further screening. Results: There were 33 (63.46%) males and 19 (36.53%) females in the study population. Patients with age >40 years were 40 (79.9%). Patients with BMI ≤ 25.0 Kg/mt2 were 14(26.9%); BMI >25.0 and ≤ 30 Kg/mt2 were 8(15.38%); BMI > 30 kg/m2 were 30(57.7%). 9(47.3%) females had neck circumference >15 inches and 10 (52.63%) males had neck circumference >17 inches which was considered as risk factor for Sleep apnea. There were no other obvious significant anthropometric abnormalities on clinical examination. 22(42.30%) subjects had hypertension (according to JNC 8 criteria). 7(13.46%) patients had diabetes mellitus. The symptomatology of the subjects is summarized in Table5. The most common symptoms were snoring 28(53.8%), excessive day time sleepiness 28(53.8%), Witnessed breathing pause 21(40.4%), frequent awakening 19(36.5%) and difficulty in falling asleep 17(32.7%). Conclusion: It is important from clinician point of view to take detail history and thorough clinical examination to suspect SDB and refer them to centers where PSG is conducted. This is possible if awareness for SDBs is increased among general population and physicians, including its effects on individuals’ physical, mental and social health and also needs to be emphasized that it is amenable to cure. Overall, polysomnography is an effective tool for diagnosis of SDBs and should be carried out in patients with symptoms suggestive of SDBs and also in patients having other co morbidities which are known to be associated with SDB.

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Published

2021-10-20

How to Cite

Raju Kottakota, Nikhila Dasari, V.V.N.Goutham, & Mahanti Sreenu. (2021). Clinical profile of sleep apnea syndrome in a tertiary care center. International Journal of Health and Clinical Research, 4(18), 331–342. Retrieved from https://ijhcr.com/index.php/ijhcr/article/view/2985